Ten Thousand Light-Years From Home

Ten Thousand Light Years From Home From one of science fiction s newest brightest talents a collection of worlds of wit and wonder demanding only that you be ready for them including AND I AWOKE AND FOUND ME HERE ON THE COLD HILL S S

  • Title: Ten Thousand Light-Years From Home
  • Author: James Tiptree Jr.
  • ISBN: 9780441801817
  • Page: 205
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • From one of science fiction s newest, brightest talents a collection of worlds of wit and wonder demanding only that you be ready for them, including AND I AWOKE AND FOUND ME HERE ON THE COLD HILL S SIDE Man seeks to get into bed with anything new and different, or die trying But when the new and different was not humanwould he die trying THE MAN WHO WALKED HOME From one of science fiction s newest, brightest talents a collection of worlds of wit and wonder demanding only that you be ready for them, including AND I AWOKE AND FOUND ME HERE ON THE COLD HILL S SIDE Man seeks to get into bed with anything new and different, or die trying But when the new and different was not humanwould he die trying THE MAN WHO WALKED HOME The first time astronaut, stuck in the far future, slid ever so slowly toward a present whose past was his future and whose future was his pastI M TOO BIG BUT I LOVE TO PLAY If genuine aliens are to communicate meaningfully, one must make himself into an analogue of the other But how can you tell the difference between what is human and what is merely identical Contents And I Awoke and Found Me Here on the Cold Hill s Side 1972 The Snows Are Melted, the Snows Are Gone 1969 The Peacefulness of Vivyan 1971 Mamma Come Home 1968 Help 1968 Painwise 1972 Faithful to Thee, Terra, in Our Fashion 1969 The Man Doors Said Hello To 1970 The Man Who Walked Home 1972 Forever to a Hudson Bay Blanket 1972 I ll Be Waiting for You When the Swimming Pool Is Empty 1971 I m Too Big but I Love to Play 1970 Birth of a Salesman 1968 Mother in the Sky with Diamonds 1971 Beam Us Home 1969

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    About " James Tiptree Jr. "

  • James Tiptree Jr.

    James Tiptree, Jr was born Alice Bradley in Chicago in 1915 Her mother was the writer Mary Hastings Bradley her father, Herbert, was a lawyer and explorer Throughout her childhood she travelled with her parents, mostly to Africa, but also to India and Southeast Asia Her early work was as an artist and art critic During World War II she enlisted in the Army and became the first American female photointelligence officer In Germany after the war, she met and married her commanding officer, Huntington D Sheldon In the early 1950s, both Sheldons joined the then new CIA he made it his career, but she resigned in 1955, went back to college, and earned a Ph.D in experimental psychology.At about this same time, Alli Sheldon started writing science fiction She wrote four stories and sent them off to four different science fiction magazines She did not want to publish under her real name, because of her CIA and academic ties, and she intended to use a new pseudonym for each group of stories until some sold They started selling immediately, and only the first pseudonym Tiptree from a jar of jelly, James because she felt editors would be receptive to a male writer, and Jr for fun was needed A second pseudonym, Raccoona Sheldon, came along later, so she could have a female persona Tiptree quickly became one of the most respected writers in the field, winning the Hugo Award for The Girl Who was Plugged In and Houston, Houston, Do You Read , and the Nebula Award for Love is the Plan, the Plan is Death and Houston, Houston Raccoona won the Nebula for The Screwfly Solution, and Tiptree won the World Fantasy Award for the collection Tales from the Quintana Roo.The Tiptree fiction reflects Alli Sheldon s interests and concerns throughout her life the alien among us a role she portrayed in her childhood travels , the health of the planet, the quality of perception, the role of women, love, death, and humanity s place in a vast, cold universe An award in Tiptree s name has celebrated science fiction that expands and explores gender roles for ten years now.Alice Sheldon died in 1987 by her own hand Writing in her first book about the suicide of Hart Crane, she said succinctly Poets extrapolate Julie Phillips wrote her biography, James Tiptree, Jr The Double Life of Alice B SheldonHere is a link to a site which now awards Science Fiction authors and their books under Alice s pen name for literature to represent gender issues within the field of writing tiptree

  • 544 Comments

  • You know this is an early edition (possibly the first edition of the first Tiptree publication?!) when the foreword just describes the author as a mysterious unknown, messing up the one concrete detail provided by following the misdirection of the male pseudonym. Anyway, this seems pretty excellent. Total aliens-and-technology sci-fi but kicks off in high gear with an unusual vividness and originality. Plus the opening story compares human fetishization (sexual or not) of alien contact with carg [...]


  • Un nombre para redescubrir. Detrás de este seudónimo se esconde una escritora capaz, inteligente y muy divertida cuando da rienda suelta a sus locuras. Pero en algunos de sus relatos la carga de filosofía, o lo que pretenda ser, es tan fuerte que acaban por cansarme. Si tengo que quedarme con un relato recomendaré uno de los últimos: la agencia que se encarga de comprobar que los productos enviados a través de las estaciones espaciales son seguras para todos los alienígenas. Quizás algú [...]


  • And I Awoke and Found Me Here on the Cold Hill’s Sideby James Tiptree, Jr. lightspeedmagazine/fic [reprint]This might be my favorite Tiptree short, which is saying a lot. Here's the WP page, for once spoiler-free: enpedia/wiki/And_I_AReally, I could try a summary, but just go read the thing, OK?A sample:“Christ, I can see her now. The first thing that hit me was discrepancy. She was a nothing—but terrific. Transfigured. Oozing it, radiating it.“The next thing was I had a horrifying hard- [...]


  • I’d never read James Tiptree, Jr before, but I knew the legend – that “Tiptree” was a brilliant SF writer who was also completely anonymous until “he’ was finally outed as Alice B. Sheldon, who used a male pen name for the simple reason that SF was generally thought to be a man’s game. Most of her work is out of print, so when I came across this at a second-hand bookstore, I jumped at the chance. It’s her first book, a collection of previously published short stories that cover a [...]



  • As someone who grew up on this stuff, I do enjoy going back to New-Wave era science fiction every now and again, and Tiptree, one of two pen names for Alice Sheldon, is some of the best of what that genre can achieve in the format. As a modern reader looking back, it's important to remember the trends of the genre at the time - reliance on clever or twist endings and often some kind of pessimistic or satirical perspective in particular - which Tiptree used plenty. A few stories really fall into [...]


  • nwhytevejournal/1582841mlThis one really did blow me away. Just a couple of weeks ago I read the Analog 6 anthology from 1968, a rather staid collection of stories in the classic sf mode. Most (though not quite all) of this 1973 collection are tremendous, many of them somewhat subversive - particularly on gender issues, this at a time when the author was still believed to be a man (and is referred to in the masculine in Harry Harrison's introduction. The one that particularly lingers with me is [...]


  • In this 1976 Gregg Press reprint edition, Tiptree's 1973 novel is introduced by Harry Harrison. The edition has an additional introduction an essay by editor Gardner Dosois on "The Great Tiptree Hunt" analyzing the bits of information known at the time that indicate just who "he" might be.


  • With most of these intriguing tales the reader is dropped into a fully-formed world without any explanation. Tiptree excels at showing rather than telling, which could put some readers off. That would be a shame because these short stories are brimming with imagination, ideas and some unforgettable imagery. Here are some brief thoughts on the stories that really stood out for me."And I Awoke and Found Me Here on the Cold Hill's Side" (1972)Could this be the “real” final frontier that we, as [...]


  • To read Tiptree (Alice Sheldon) is to touch both her savage love for full and vibrant life, and also her loathing of a malingering toward slow death. Her stories are not easy, and contain a hefty spit in the eye to the ravages of mortal existence. This is a great and challenging collection of her most fierce visions.


  • Sometimes I am almost nostalgic for a the days of the science fiction magazines, which arrived fresh each month with several brand-new imaginative stories that spread across the universe — something I didn’t even experience firsthand. But I’ve caught the wave from things like that Deep Space Nine episode “Far Beyond the Stars” where Captain Sisko was transported back in time to a sci-fi magazine called Incredible Tales in 1950s New York City. What becomes super clear in that episode is [...]


  • Ten Thousand Light-Years from Home (1973) was James Tiptree, Jr's (Alice Sheldon) first published book. As a first short story collection, it contains some quite brilliant work as well as a few weaker entries. But overall, Sheldon exhibits an imagination and dark humor that rivals Harlan Ellison's. Her stories reflect her interests as a psychologist--ranging from the alien among us (whether an actual alien or a human who feels out of place among his peers) to women's roles to love, death, and hu [...]


  • This is one of the earliest collections of Tiptree’s short fiction. Something that really helps show the age is the gender assumption for the author in the introduction. There’s a lot more carefree whimsy in some of these, but the satirical bite is swimming just below the surface of what could just be a rollicking tale of two-fisted glory. The collection is worth the investment of time. I’ll cover some of my favorites here."And I Awoke" Takes an unblinking stare at the human sex drive and [...]


  • Wooah!!! Now here is an unexpectedly zestful collection of brain-warping word-smithery. Not since first reading Harlen Ellison have I been so pleasantly confounded by a writer's feverishly iconoclastic visions. This is far-flung sf but of an inordinately screwy variety (and that's a jolly good thing); cliche is rigorously dispensed with, giddily replaced with bravura badinage and oodles of whip-smart originality. Like Zappa or Kraftwerk, Tiptree takes ostensibly familiar tropes, non-musical natc [...]


  • I am a sucker for short stories, so this sort of thing is my favourite introduction to a writer.It would be easy for me to say that I always knew there was something not right about James Tiptree Jr. but it would not be fair. All I knew was that I was reading short, experimental stories by someone with an immense talent and levels of humanity and emotional intelligence sadly lacking in a lot of what I had read before.As experimental stories they are very varied and some of them didn't really con [...]


  • Alice Sheldon, better known by the pseudonym James Tiptree, jr, was one of the greatest science fiction short story writers of all time. I say that without reservation or qualification. The four (or five?) collected volumes are all well-worth reading. Ten Thousand Light Years might be the best, but I wouldn't quibble. If nothing else, read the two stories of the first alien invasions of Earth—"Mamma Come Home," and "Help". The grimness of some her stories sometimes makes people forget the extr [...]


  • This edition of this book should be burned--no TOC, no break between stories (was that a new story title or did someone just shout?), and probably a typo every 10 pages. I've read OCR'ed ebooks copied at a slant in more coherent condition. And an unremovable cardboard cigarette ad in the middle to boot (thank god the 70's are over!). I thought the first 7 stories were terrible. Without the first ~160-170 pages I would have rated the collection 4 stars or above--the rest were pretty enjoyable! Da [...]


  • I almost gave up on this a few times - it is bogged-down by several mostly goofy, mostly overlong stories about aliens (they're ridiculous enough that I'm not even sure if they're supposed to send-up the genre or not). I'm glad I followed through however, because Tiptree definitely delivers with some good weird tales here. Some of the standouts include:The Snows Are Melted, the Snows Are GoneThe Man Doors Said Hello ToThe Man Who Walked HomeForever to a Hudson Bay BlanketI'm Too Big but I Love t [...]


  • I started this book (a collection of short science fiction) and wasn't all that enraptured by the first few stories, so I set it aside for a bit. But then I came back to it and I'm glad I did, because I ended up enjoying it a great deal.Some of these stories are funny; most of them at least have a noticeable sense of humor to them. A lot of them are sad, but then, that's scifi, right? James Tiptree Jr. is the pen name of a lady writer, and knowing that, I was hoping for a little more stuff deali [...]


  • I seem to have managed to find the Tiptree collection that features none of her really famous stories, so i'll have to go check those out too. This one isn't bad, though - perhaps becuase I was looking for it - theres not much concern with gender. (The introduction refers to the author as a man.) Theres is sex though, and quite a bit of farce. A lot of the stories tend to an almost cartoonish sensibility, only to hide a nasty sting somewhere. I largerly preffered these shorter, sharper stories t [...]


  • I loved "Her Smoke Rose Up Forever" and "Tales of the Quintana Roo" but many of the stories in this collection came up short, at least for me. I didn't check the chronology, but the common view is that "Tiptree" was much less inspired and productive after his/her exposure, and I'm betting that some or all of these stories came from that period. There were a few good ones, but if you like HSRUF, I recommend you quit there. But if you like the stories, don't fail to read her biography.


  • Faithful To Thee, Terra, In Our Fashion, included in this great collection, is one of the best sf stories I've read (and I have read a few). She has an incomparable way of writing human interaction with extraterrestrials and this story is the author's shining triumph. Should be required reading for all fans of the genre.


  • All I can say is WOW! Once I got used to the authors style I became more and more impressed as I read through this astoundingly good collection.These fifteen short stories are so engaging, well written, and entertaining that I will definitely read more of this authors work.Just a really, really good read.


  • One third of this anthology is really good, one third is okay, and the remaining third is crap. I think I was more enamored with the mystery that was James Tiptree (Alice Sheldon) than I was her stories. The writing reminded me of Ian Banks, but at some point Banks explains what he's writing, and I felt Tiptree just left you with a feeling of what the fuck.


  • What a brilliant author! Some of the stories in this collection are amongst the best science fiction stories I've ever read. They vary from incredible flights of fantasy through pathos, humour and inventiveness.



  • Stories that manage to be even more compelling and brain-twistingly awesome than the author's biography. Fantastic stuff.


  • A good early collection of Tiptree's work. A couple of the stories get bogged down and awkward, but a satisfying read overall.



  • If one likes fantasy/science fiction then one should read James Tiptree, Jr. (the pen name of Alice Sheldon)


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