The Moth

The Moth Robert Bradley a young man of independent mind and spirit gave up his job in the Jarrow shipyards to work at his uncle s old established carpenter s shop in a small village Life with domineering Unc

  • Title: The Moth
  • Author: Catherine Cookson
  • ISBN: 9780671644789
  • Page: 333
  • Format: Paperback
  • Robert Bradley, a young man of independent mind and spirit, gave up his job in the Jarrow shipyards to work at his uncle s old established carpenter s shop in a small village Life with domineering Uncle John and his family did not always prove easy, however, and on Sunday Robert was glad to set off alone exploring the Durham countryside At a friendly wayside inn he heardRobert Bradley, a young man of independent mind and spirit, gave up his job in the Jarrow shipyards to work at his uncle s old established carpenter s shop in a small village Life with domineering Uncle John and his family did not always prove easy, however, and on Sunday Robert was glad to set off alone exploring the Durham countryside At a friendly wayside inn he heard talk about Foreshaw Park, the sadly run down estate of the once wealthy Thorman family, and walking home in the moonlight he had his first strange encounter with Millie, the ethereal girl child of that house whose odd ways and nocturnal wanderings had led to her being known locally as Thorman s Moth The time came when a sudden and dramatic turn in Robert s affairs brought him a much closer involvement with the Thormans of Foreshaw, and especially with the elder daughter Agnes who shouldered so many of the burdens of this troubled household and who alone of all her family loved and protected the frail unworldly Millie But this was 1913, and anything beyond the most formal relationship between servant and mistress had to face the barriers and injustices of a rigid social hierarchy that was soon to perish in the flames of war.

    The Moth is an acclaimed not for profit organization dedicated to the art craft of storytelling It has presented true first person stories worldwide. The Moth YouTube The Moth Home Facebook The Moth, New York, New York K likes The Moth s mission is to promote the art and craft of storytelling and to honor and celebrate the diversity and The Moth The Moth is a non profit group based in New York City dedicated to the art and craft of storytelling Founded in , the organization presents a wide range of theme based storytelling events across the United States and abroad, often featuring prominent literary and cultural personalities The Moth offers a weekly podcast and in launched a national public radio show, The Moth Radio Hour The Moth TheMoth Twitter The Moth Listen to Podcasts On Demand Free TuneIn The Moth is an acclaimed not for profit organization dedicated to the art and craft of storytelling It is a celebration of both the raconteur, who breathes fire into true tales of ordinary life, and the storytelling novice, who has lived through something extraordinary and yearns to share it. The Moth by The Moth on Apple Podcasts rowsiTunes is the world s easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection We The Moth Kindle edition by James Braly, Catherine Burns The Moth is an acclaimed not for profit organization dedicated to the art and craft of storytelling It is a celebration of both the raconteur, who breathes fire into true tales of ordinary life, and the storytelling novice, who has lived through something extraordinary and yearns to share it. The Moth Web Player The Moth Web Player Loading The Moth Since its launch in , The Moth has presented thousands of true stories, told live and without notes, to standing room only crowds worldwide.

    • Free Read [Philosophy Book] ✓ The Moth - by Catherine Cookson ↠
      333 Catherine Cookson
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Philosophy Book] ✓ The Moth - by Catherine Cookson ↠
      Posted by:Catherine Cookson
      Published :2018-07-05T16:52:15+00:00

    About " Catherine Cookson "

  • Catherine Cookson

    Catherine Cookson was born in Tyne Dock, the illegitimate daughter of a poverty stricken woman, Kate, who Catherine believed was her older sister Catherine began work in service but eventually moved south to Hastings, where she met and married Tom Cookson, a local grammar school master Although she was originally acclaimed as a regional writer her novel The Round Tower won the Winifred Holtby Award for the best regional novel of 1968 her readership quickly spread throughout the world, and her many best selling novels established her as one of the most popular contemporary woman novelist She received an OBE in 1985, was created a Dame of the British Empire in 1993, and was appointed an Honorary Fellow of St Hilda s College, Oxford, in 1997 For many years she lived near Newcastle upon Tyne.

  • 376 Comments

  • Set in 1913 Northumbria, England, the story is about Robert Bradley, a strong-willed young worker at a Jarrow shipyard, who arrives home one day to find that his father has died. At the funeral he meets his father's estranged brother, his uncle John Bradley, and his wife Alice who offer Robert a new home and a place in his uncle's carpentry workshop. Robert accepts and after a few weeks at his new home, he is out walking late one night on the grounds of a rundown estate when he meets an ethereal [...]


  • (view spoiler)[Bettie's BooksThe rating, any status updates, and those bookshelves, indicate my feelings for this book. (hide spoiler)]


  • This is my third Cookson novel, & I don't think I'll be reading any others. My first Cookson was 'The Whip', & it contained what I thought to be an inordinate amount of Life Suffering(tm)ever, I liked the MCs & assumed the onslaught was in homage to Victorian fiction where the poor heroine barely survives to reach her HEA. I still like 'The Whip' & remember it fondly. But I've since discovered that Cookson's copious Life Suffering style isn't making a statement about the genre -- [...]


  • "The Moth" nicknames a flighty young lady, eccentric to the point of madness in the eyes of the men of her family, but well loved by longtime servants and her repressed 26 year old sister, Agnes. After he first glimpses the girls by moonlight, charismatic carpenter Robert, confident (upstart, say some) in his well-read, clear-speaking intelligence, escaping concupiscent nymphomaniacs, joins the minimal unpaid staff of the decaying estate. Catherine Cookson, experienced from impoverished birth in [...]


  • Loved this book! (and if you get the chance to see the BFS film version (Jack Davenport and Juliet Aubrey 1997 its well worth a viewing and is faithful to the book). There is some cussing of the British variety (calling into question one's parentage mainly) but no sex. It's a classic "two people who arent social equals fall in love". Great storyAnd by the way, if a hero doesn't end up half dead, blind, scarred and crippled by the end of a CC novel someone hyjacked it!


  • As in most of Cookson's books she writes with strong female characters overcoming some miserable circumstance or misfortune. I also love the English accents given her characters. If you like books set in old England and well developed characters, you will enjoy books by Catherine Cookson!


  • I can almost cut and paste the review for "The Glass Virgin" and put it here. The main difference is that Agnes must choose between being a poor spinster within the gentry class or being a tradesman's wife without title or upper crust ties. For those of us who haven't lived in turn of the century England, the choice seems like a no brainer, but at that time, the conflict was great. Once again the reader is left wondering if love can overpower disinheritance and social isolation. What also makes [...]


  • Had this book on my shelf unread since 1991. I assumed it was about a ghost, like the girl in white who appears to driver's on some road or a story in that genre. After 22 years of thinking this way, I had a real hard time at the beginning getting it through my skull it wasn't that type of story. Once my brain accepted it, it was a good book.


  • Beautifully written, positively spellbinding! Catherine Cookson had such a talent for bringing her characters and the localities to life. Many authors have a talent for it, but hers was more than outstanding!!!


  • This was the first book by Catherine Cookson that I have read and have since read many others. This book was an unusual love story and so engrossing.


  • This writer is unique and disturbing enough to make the reader jolt out of their comfort zone. She shows different class perspectives that are honest and believable. An exquisite read. Lovely.


  • There's some line in Anne of Green Gables where Anne describes the ocean as something that blows out the cobwebs of her soul. This is what Catherine Cookson books (at her best) do for me. I'm always sort of driven up and outward when reading my favourites by her, particularly The Moth and Fifteen Streets, and she expresses in me a wonderful sort of restlessness. Maybe its that she's able to pen words to abstract feelings. I dunno. I just know I'm grateful to have read her books. The critics are [...]




  • I have been stuck on this one for months, and I am calling it quits on this one. I kept feeling that the storyline does have promise, and yet I just can't force myself to continue this book. I feel it is dragging so slowly that I just don't care enough to continue. I hate to be a quitter, but several months is just too long to keep struggling with it. I desperately need a fast page turner novel to carry me away afar off.


  • I read all of Catherine Cookson's books some years ago and enjoyed them immensley. I recently re-read all of them and find that on a second look I found them all so very predictable, and was rather disappointed. However I'm sure that it is my tastes that have changed not the calibre of her story telling.


  • Bought the original hardback as I could never wait to read Catherine Cookson's books even then. A great read in my opinion. The story of Robert Bradley whose encounter with Millie "The Moth" led him to a change of employment from self-employed due to a falling out with his uncle to a servant in Millie's house and his prickly relationship with the Butler and at times Millie's eldest sister Agnes.


  • I didn't enjoy this book at all. I found it slow, poorly written, and lacking in good morals. However, I loved the movie by itvDVD! Usually, it's the other way around: I'll love the book and feel the movie fell short. Not in this case, apparently.


  • As a diversion from his job in his uncle's carpentry shop, newly arrived Robert Bradley began to explore the Durham countryside. It was on one of these walks that he met Millie, the ethereal girl-child whose odd ways and nocturnal wanderings has led her to be known locally as Thorman's Moth.





  • 4 stars until the ending, which I found a bit too harsh. It's supposedly a happy ending, but it's definitely not in every sense.






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